SculptureX: Material/ Immaterial, through October 19

. October 14, 2019.
Untitled by Elizabeth Cote. School of the Art Institute of Chicago, MFA. Latex, metal, tension wire. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.
Untitled by Elizabeth Cote. School of the Art Institute of Chicago, MFA. Latex, metal, tension wire. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

It’s inevitable that a group show juried by a single artist will reflect the preoccupations and interests of that artist. But you would be hard-pressed to see a collection of objects in the unique but derelict space on the 7th floor of Toledo’s historic Secor Building that more clearly reflects the esthetic of juror Scott Hocking. Hocking, well known and admired as a keen observer of Detroit’s constantly morphing urban landscape, reviewed submissions for this show presenting a distinctive collection of artworks that function more like an installation than as individual objects.

Hocking is a connoisseur of solastalgia, a form of existential distress caused by environmental change. It can be either global or local. In Hocking’s case, it centers on the City of Detroit. (His companion show at the Walter T. Terhune Gallery at Owens Community College provides a visual manifesto of his world view.)

Material/Immaterial, on view through October 19th, features the work of 25 young artists from the Great Lakes region. They work in three dimensions and in a variety of materials, some conventional and some, not-so-much. It looks like the first art exhibit after the apocalypse.

The venue for Material/Immaterial is as much a part of this exhibition as the works displayed; there is a seamlessness between the environment and the art pieces in it that is quintessentially Hocking. In contrast to the anonymity of a white box gallery, the space exerts a gravitational pull on the objects and seems to absorb them into its orbit. Many of the artworks feel as if they have been discarded or accidentally left behind. The entire installation celebrates the esthetic of the found object.

Many of the pieces in the exhibit seem to be chance results of natural disasters. Summer Gobrecht’s Serendipity, a cluster of dish-shaped, splashed-plaster objects clustered in a tiled surround, supposes the elegant, ghostly record of a meteor impact on a distant moon. A different, more human kind of calamity is implied in Leather Shoes, by Tom Reihart. Child-sized legs and feet protrude, abandoned, from beneath a dark cloth and suggest a story of personal catastrophe.

Serendipity by Summer Gobrecht. University of Toledo, BFA. Plaster. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

Serendipity by Summer Gobrecht. University of Toledo, BFA. Plaster. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

A more humorous take on disaster is delivered by Shawn Campbell, who works in diverse media including photography, sculpture, video installation and painting. He specializes in ad hoc celebrations of spectacle involving civil, financial and political power that both provokes amusement and provides some shrewd social commentary on contemporary social and economic trends. A favorite piece of the show is Campbell’s oil-spouting plywood construction (Untitled), seemingly the bastard offspring of a beaux arts fountain and a toxic waste dump, simultaneously hilarious and sinister.

Untitled by Shawn Campbell. University of Georgia, MFA. Mixed media sculpture. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

Untitled by Shawn Campbell. University of Georgia, MFA. Mixed media sculpture. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

Another piece in Material/Immaterial is by Elizabeth Cote. At first glance it appears to be a quilt, carelessly thrown over a laundry line, but on closer inspection, it emerges that the “quilt” is, in fact, a folded latex mold pieced together to describe the limp façade of a building. The artist details her process: “This is a latex of a plaster of a clay of a drawing of a picture that I did not take off a building … It is not an impression taken from a physical building, but the impression of the building on me.”

Meagan Smith’s collection of small (mostly) porcelain objects are displayed on the only clean white walls in the exhibit, a free-standing gallery that has landed in the middle of a ruined landscape. These intimate biomorphic doodads are displayed on small glass shelves. They suggest “sacs, tubes, fleshy folds, hives, nets, plants, webs.” The diminutive sculptures simultaneously appear to be carefully crafted fine art pieces and found natural artifacts like fossils or exoskeletons or seashells.

Iterations by Meagan Smith. Kent State University. Porcelain, glaze, mason stains, plexiglass, aluminum. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

Iterations by Meagan Smith. Kent State University. Porcelain, glaze, mason stains, plexiglass, aluminum. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

One of the few pieces in Material/ Immaterial that proclaim its status as a work of fine art is I Expand, I am Warm; Blue Cannon Steel; Blue Silo by Laura Dirksen, a cheerful, chunky, colorful stoneware assemblage that’s engaging and energetic. It radiates a kind of infectious animal attraction. Across the gallery, Claudia Tommasi keeps the party going with two small scale wall-mounted pieces, bulbous and stringy, that exude Looneytunes humor, Untitled (2).

I Expand, I am Warm; Blue Cannon Steel; Blue Silo by Laura Dirksen. Bowling Green State University, BFA. Stoneware, slip, various glazes. 2018-2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

I Expand, I am Warm; Blue Cannon Steel; Blue Silo by Laura Dirksen. Bowling Green State University, BFA. Stoneware, slip, various glazes. 2018-2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

Untitled (2) by Claudia Tommasi. Paper clay, underglaze, glaze. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

Untitled (2) by Claudia Tommasi. Paper clay, underglaze, glaze. 2019. Photo Credit: KA Letts.

Although Material/Immaterial might seem to project existential end-of-the-world gloom, the show actually created a strangely optimistic feeling. These artists seem to imply that although things are bad–well, okay, maybe catastrophic–they still are hopeful and idealistic enough to keep working and making art, and to keep observing the world and commenting on it. Things may turn out all right after all.

SculptureX is a yearly symposium sponsored by Contemporary Art Toledo and devoted to collaboration and networking among artists and art teaching institutions. Material/Immaterial was juried by Scott Hocking, with curatorial assistance from Brian Carpenter.

On view through October 19 on the 7th Floor Gallery
Secor Building, 425 Jefferson Ave., Toledo.