Women in Business 2019

. March 26, 2019.
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Special Advertising Section

This Women in Business issue features business owners—from those who have been in business for decades to those who’ve only recently celebrated their grand opening. The entrepreneurial prowess of these profiled owners includes sharing insight into the receptiveness of various industries and how they’ve used stereotypes, traditionally (and wrongly) viewed as women’s weaknesses, to their advantage. These locals have one thing in common— they haven’t let anything prevent their dreams becoming a reality.

Jenifer-Ludwig

Jennifer Ludwig

HLS Orthodontics
Sylvania: 6407 Monroe St., 419-882-1017.
Lambertville, MI: 7928 Secor Rd., 734-854-6221.
Maumee: 4359 Keystone Dr. Suite 200, 419-887-1247.
perfectbraces.com

What do you do?
I enable patients to create fantastic smiles and lead a team of 30 members to do it in the most fun environment possible. I am an orthodontist.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Those that judge you on your gender are saying something about themselves, not you.

What woman do you most admire?
My mother for empowering me to think critically and my grandmother for her pioneering spirit. As far as “people in the news,” I admire Ruth Bader Ginsburg for her quiet strength.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
The emotions we perceive and transmit. Both men and women can be too emotional, but emotional needs cannot be ignored or discounted if you want the best results with patients and co-workers.

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women? Fighting the myth that the gender gap is small or closed. I have it so much easier than my colleague that graduated as the only woman in the entire dental school, but women are still underrepresented in leadership roles and pay equality is not a reality yet.

How has your industry changed for women since you first got your start?
When I went to dental school, the class was 28 percent women. The 2018 entering class was 51 percent women. I feel the reduction in gender stereotypes have allowed women to live up to their potential in math and science fields.

How do you stay motivated?
I look at the great team, the wonderful patients with whom I work and the fantastic smiles we create.

Amy-Jones

Amy Jones

Liberty Title
4210 W Sylvania Ave., 419-517-5000.
libertytitleUSA.com

What do you do?
To my knowledge, I am the only woman-owned real estate title company in the city. We do real estate settlements/closings for homes, commercial sites and residential refinances.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
“How do you react to the success of others?”

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
How to say “no” politely.

How, if at all, has being a woman impacted your career?
My industry is primarily made up of male-owned businesses, so being a woman in my industry has been interesting, but I am always up for a good challenge!

What woman do you most admire?
It sounds cliché, but my mom— she is a full-time worker and the best homemaker I know. She definitely runs a tight ship and let’s you know you are loved at the same time!

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Never have any regrets, because what you did was what you wanted at the time and led you to where you are today. Oh, and if you want that ice cream, just eat it!

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
The age old, “Oh, women are too nice and sweet to be taken seriously in business.” I don’t know about you, but I still find you get more with honey!

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Speaking up— It’s not enough to be in a role or to sit at the table, you must also speak confidently, regardless of the odds faced.

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Signing a three-year lease for a commercial building prior to taking my test for my license, but I had faith and it worked out.

What’s your professional philosophy?
There is always room to learn and grow and mistakes are teaching opportunities, not failures.

How do you stay motivated?
I never focus on the things that are out of my control, and I give myself rewards for accomplishments— that usually involves shopping.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
I’ve always heard successful people say things like, “talk good, talk bad, but keep talking about me,” I never really understood that but now that colleagues are talking about me, I’m starting to get it.

Laurie-Gross

Laurie Gross

Gross Electric Lighting Showroom & Electrical Supply Counters
Ann Arbor, MI: 2232 S. Industrial Hwy., 734-665-8676.
Toledo: 2807 N. Reynolds Rd., 419-537-1818.
Electrical Supply Counter only:
2521 Woodville Rd., Northwood. 419-698-1818.
grosselectric.com

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves? “Are you going to love what you’re doing?”

How has your industry changed for women since you first got your start?
Much more inclusive…although there are many more women than when I started, there still aren’t that many, at least on the electrical supply end of the business.

How do you stay motivated?
I love what I do. Whenever I get overwhelmed, I go out on the showroom floor and spend the day waiting on customers, it reinvigorates me.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
We take professional pictures of our lighting jobs, which we post around our showroom. I remember looking at one of the job photos that looks like it could be in Architectural Digest and thinking, “Wow, I did the lighting to make that house look like that!”

What’s your professional philosophy?
Be positive about every situation. Do the best you can for your people, your customers and your company.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
Our empathy. It allows us to see situations from all angles and work for the best solutions rather than just going for the “win.”

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
You can have it “all,” just know what your “all” is.

Claudia

Claudia David-Roscoe

Health Foods by Claudia
3904 Secor Rd., 419-474-2400.
healthfoodsbyclaudia.com

What do you do?
I am proud to share 45 years’ experience in the business of natural health and wellness through mindful living, self-empowerment and love, not fear. I teach the tools that nature offers us and the power they offer to facilitate our body’s own ability to heal through balance and wholeness of the individual.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
Every entrepreneur should ask themselves if they believe in what they do, are they self-motivated and do they understand business? It takes all three qualities to be successful.

What woman do you most admire?
The woman I respect most is my mother because she lived by what she believed and always walked her talk, even when it was not the popular thing to do. She embraced her health every day, always from a place of love and care. She understood and prioritized the important role that food has in our lives and for our health and I’m so grateful.

How, if at all, has being a woman impacted your career?
The best advice I’ve ever received when it comes to business was to always know the numbers, understand the margins and to stay focused on what I wanted to accomplish. The best life advice I ever received was to live from my heart and stay focused on my own truth.

What’s your professional philosophy?
Business should always be based on integrity.

How do you stay motivated?
What motivates me has always been the love for my family, keeping faith in the goodness of people and being blessed to witness thousands of people reclaim their health safely and effectively through dedication and love.

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Ann Roller

Executive Director, Ohio Living Swan Creek
5916 Cresthaven Ln., 419-865-4445.
ohioliving.org/communities/ohio-living-swan-creek

What do you do?
I lead the day-to-day operations of Ohio Living Swan Creek. Our 150 employees serve more than 200 residents with independent living in apartments and villas, assisted living, short-term rehabilitation, long-term nursing care and memory care.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
No matter your role, it’s always important to be authentic with people. You develop more beneficial relationships with colleagues, employees, customers, board members and more when they can see who you really are. Don’t hide behind the formalities of your leadership role.

How, if at all, has being a woman impacted your career?
As a wife, mother and professional, it can be easy to feel there’s not enough of me to go around. While no one can completely leave their other roles at the doorstep when they arrive at work every day, juggling these responsibilities requires times of laser-like focus on each area in order to fulfill each role well. When I’m at work, I’m fully present. However, these roles also allow me to bring broader perspectives to the table as a leader.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
I think that showing vulnerability is a huge strength and advantage. Dr. Brenė Brown’s research shows that vulnerability is the greatest measure of courage. It allows us to stand up for what is right in the face of those who disagree. It’s one of the most important qualities of a leader.

What’s your professional philosophy?
I believe that my primary role as a leader is to help my employees succeed in their efforts. If I can give them the proper direction, resources and empowerment to do their jobs, they are likely to do them well, with a high degree of satisfaction and engagement. That equates to great care for our residents, and better business outcomes for the organization.

How do you stay motivated?
My passion for our not-for-profit mission keeps me motivated. Our employees bring their hearts to their work every day, and it shows in the care our residents receive. Getting to know our residents is a privilege and they become like family. It makes me appreciate the role I have in their lives and motivates me to do all I can to help their quality of life.

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Diana M. Spiess

Essence Mind*Body Studio, LLC
725 Ford St. B., Maumee.
419-873-6463. Dianaspiess.com.
essencembs.com

What do you do?
I am a health, fitness, and wellness professional that uses many holistic and functional modalities from both Eastern and Western backgrounds to help my clients be healthy on all levels, pain free, and balance stress in their lives.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
Why are you doing what you do? It will only work if it brings you true joy…not just happiness. True joy encompasses the entire spectrum of this journey and when we are joyful we embrace the lessons as gratefully as we do the happy moments. If it is your true passion and calling, then it will manifest through joy.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Balancing it all does not mean that we have to be perfect…nor should we ever try to be. It is important to make time for ourselves, to remember that we are human, and to be willing to say “no” when it is necessary. Not only are we responsible for caring for others, but also we must care for ourselves and remember that we are setting the example for all the young girls watching us. Actions speak louder than words…and they are watching.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
Women are very intuitive by nature. It is a part of being a woman and is a very powerful trait that can assist in any circumstance if a woman knows how to use it and not let it burn her out or drain her. With all I have done in my career, whether working in the physical or energetic realm, it is my most powerful “tool”. My clients always ask, “How did you know that?” Some things can be taught and others things are “just known.”

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Opening my own studio when there was nothing at all like it in this area at that time was the biggest risk I have taken in my career.

How do you stay motivated?
My clients tell me all the time how much I have helped them change their lives so dramatically for the better. This brings me so much motivation, joy, and gratitude.

Open-Arms

Ashley J. Hirzel, LMT

Open Arms Wellness Center
300 Navarre Ave #204, Oregon. 419-720-8604.
openarmsmassagestudio.com

What do you do?
I like to think of myself as a one-of-a-kind compassionate licensed massage therapist.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
“Do you have what it takes?”

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
You will be questioned 100 percent of the time about any decision you make. Know that as long as you believe in yourself, you will succeed!

What woman do you most admire?
I have several women that I admire— some that don’t even know it. But my number one person I admire and who has helped me become who I am today is my mother. We may butt heads sometimes but we always work it out. It’s a good thing I received the peaceful genes!

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Keep going and never stop!

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Knowing that we are enough to make what we want happen, and we do not need anyone to do it for us!

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Opening the Yoga Loft! Something that I wasn’t particularly ready to do but knew it was needed and wanted for the community!

What’s your professional philosophy?
Everything I do is for the happiness and well-being of my clients!

How do you stay motivated?
I keep educating myself and taking chances!

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
The Soft Opening Night of the Loft we took in over 140 people and there wasn’t a parking spot open!

avantGarde---Christine

Christine Neuman

Avant Garde Designs
115 W Front St., Perrysburg. 419-873-6285.
facebook.com/AvantGardeInteriors

What do you do?
I am the owner of Avant Garde Designs.We are a full service interior design studio providing designs for both residential and commercial projects. I design and coordinate the entire project including, just to name a few, furniture, window treatments, space planning, lighting, etc.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
“Are you passionate about your business?” If you are not, you can not possibly give your client what they need and deserve.

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Love what you do and do what you love!

What’s your professional philosophy?
My professional philosophy is this: really get to know your clients, their needs and desires, then use your talent and experience to work with them to achieve their goals.

How do you stay motivated?
I stay motivated by continuing to keep updated on new products for my clients, such as furniture, fabric, hardware, and new wall treatments. I go to design trade shows so that my library is always current.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
I have had several, but the one that always makes me happy is when a client that I have worked with in the past calls me 15 years later and says “we are so happy you are still available because we loved what you did for us in the past!” That is a special moment!

Laura

Laura Sheahan

Three Girlz Urban Living
4728 Navarre Ave., Oregon. 419-690-4780.
threegirlzurbanliving.com

What do you do?
I am an interior designer and owner of Three Girlz Urban Living.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
“What are you willing to sacrifice to make your dream a reality?”

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Always remember what you bring to the table and be willing to eat alone.

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Someone once told me to choose my words carefully. Then they explained that your words become your actions, your actions become your habits, your habits become your character and character is everything.

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Understanding that you sometimes start at the bottom, that it takes hard work, long hours, and no one is entitled to anything.

What’s your professional philosophy?
To help you design a space that is uniquely you. This is obtained by meeting and understanding you, using your existing architecture, design concepts and your personal taste. We then develop layouts, color coordinated furniture and fabrics and add the final touches of accessories which results in a functional space that is well designed with a distinct look.  

How has your industry changed for women since you first got your start?
The design industry has always been dominated by women, but now men are equally as successful.

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Payton Demoe

Toledo Hemp Center
815 Phillips Ave., 419-724-9588.
toledohempcenter.com

What do you do?
I manage the Toledo Hemp Center on a daily basis.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
“If this made you absolutely no money, would you still love what you do?”

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Stand your ground and never let anyone make you feel as if you’re less because you are a woman.

How, if at all, has being a woman impacted your career?
As a 20-year-old woman, people judge me instantly. But it has never impacted my career. It has taught me to be strong and keep pushing.

What woman do you most admire?
I most admire my mother. She made mistakes when younger and bounced back stronger than I could have ever imagined.

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Don’t listen to what other people say; only what you think about yourself matters.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
Being a female, period. It’s a powerpoint because we have more compassion for everything we do.

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Not listening to what the world has to say about you. Right now everyone is so worried about getting the perfect picture for Instagram to make sure they get so many likes on it. But when you are 30, is that even gonna matter? I just hope the next generation learns to love themselves and that no one’s opinion matters. Do you.

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Eliminating an employee from the company.

How has your industry changed for women since you first got your start?
It hasn’t. The cannabis industry has always been so loving and accepting to women. The cannabis industry truly loves everyone.

How do you stay motivated?
I try my hardest to stay motivated, but let’s be real, I have my down days where I want to do NOTHING. In the end, I know I have an amazing baby boy on the way. It’s not just providing for myself; I have another life to support and guide through this crazy thing called life.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
When I became the manager, people may think it was handed to me because my parents own it, but I honestly had to work hard to get where I am. Living at home with my parents, home was work and work was work. It never stopped. When I got promoted it was just an amazing feeling.

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Alicia & Lauren Henderson

Untamed Salon
2712 Central Ave., 419-725-8404.
untamedsalonllc.com

What do you do?
Untamed Salon was started by two sisters who love what they do, and take pride in helping their clients feel better about themselves. Our specialists take pride in helping our clients feel great inside and out by using the best products available in the beauty industry. Our products are ammonia free, pod free, and hypo allergenic.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
Every entrepreneur should ask themselves if they are willing to set goals daily and give it their all to knock it out of the park.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Every business woman should always remember that we are all different in our own great fierce way, and that’s what makes us so special.

How, if at all, has being a woman impacted your career?
Being a woman, mother, and wife helps me relate to every other woman that walks through our door. We are living their lives and are here to take that load off and help them escape the daily stresses of our world, even if just for a minute.

What woman do you most admire?
I admire my sister more than any other women I’ve known. I have watched her struggle with no sleep to get where we are at and never give up. I couldn’t have asked for a better friend/business partner.

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
The best advice I ever received was to put it in the atmosphere. If you believe it then you will receive it. Keep a vision and never let it go!

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
People tend to think that women are weak but I am here to tell you that is not the case. We are driven, focused, yet kind-hearted and compassionate— the perfect blend if you ask me!

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
I believe the biggest challenge for women in the next generation will be to just love themselves wholeheartedly just the way they are. There is so much pressure put on women everyday and we need to remind the younger generation that we are all perfectly imperfect, so embrace it! There is only one you!

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Opening a salon with my sister was the biggest risk I ever took. There was so much on the line. Everyone said before it was over we wouldn’t speak anymore. Six years later we are together even on our days off!

How has your industry changed for women since you first got your start?
More women today are going out on a limb and trying new things in the beauty industry. Things that were never okay are accepted now. These women are unstoppable! Girls rock!

How do you stay motivated?
We stay motivated by feeding off each other. We all have bad days, but that’s what’s great about having a partner. When you need lifting and motivation, the other person is there to pump you up.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
The day we opened the doors was the first “wow” surreal moment. When we got this building, we personally— with our own hands and two saws— cut down 21 trees outside. We knocked down walls, pulled up the carpet, and installed backsplashes. Our children got to witness what a dream and blood, sweat, and tears
will do! It was and still is so amazing!

Arrowhead

Mary Beth Alberti

Arrowhead Behavioral Health
1725 Timberline Rd., Maumee. 419-891-9333.
arrowheadbehavioral.com

What do you do?
I am the Director of Business Development at Arrowhead Behavioral Health and the Board of Trustees President for the Thomas M. Wernert Center.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
To mentor other women throughout the course of your work and career… because leadership is helping others.

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Never, ever, ever, ever, ever give up.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
I believe that sensitivity and caring provide women with the power to build relationships.

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
To find balance in family, home, career, community and self.

How has your industry changed for women since you first got your start?
Leadership positions are more accessible as the doors to advancement open up to women with track records of achievement and perseverance.

What’s your professional philosophy?
If we did all the things we were capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves.

How do you stay motivated?
Striving to consistently take each aspect of my life to the next level.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
Seeing the positive impact that can be made in providing the opportunity for an individual to change their own life.

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Angie Cucunato

Flying Rhino Coffee
201 Morris, Suite G. 419-378-1798.
flyingrhinocoffee.com

What do you do?
I am the owner and roaster of Flying Rhino Coffee! We are a small roastery and retail shop in the Warehouse District.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Imposter Syndrome is very real. Celebrate all of your victories, no matter how insignificant they seem. You earned your accomplishments! You are a badass!

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Business owners receive an exorbitant amount of unsolicited advice. It can quickly become confusing/discouraging/anger-inducing. Most people want the best for you, but no one knows your company like you do. Listen to your instincts!

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Recently, I quit my job of 10 years. I knew that if I wanted my business to grow that I needed to invest more of myself. It was one of the most difficult decisions I have ever made. Now, every morning I walk into a shop that I own, drink coffee that I roasted, and sell to people who believe in me and my product. I think I made the right choice!

How do you stay motivated?
I am lucky to love what I do and there are a lot of folx in my industry keeping it interesting and fun! When I do lack drive or knowledge to make big decisions, I lean on my support systems. My friends keep me accountable.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
I have been waiting for five years to purchase a new coffee roaster. It arrives in two weeks!

tamara

Tamara D. Willingham-Rapp, L.Ac., MSAOM, Dipl. O.M., LMT

Tamara TCM Acupuncture & Herbs Wellness Clinic
120 W. Dudley St., Maumee. 419-345-4996.
TamaraTCM.com

What do you do?
I practice Traditional Chinese Medicine using acupuncture and herbal formulations to restore balance in the body. I promote the body’s amazing ability to heal itself.

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Life is not personal.

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
The biggest risk was just getting started and going off to Seattle for my training. I gave up everything I had pretty much, for the chance to possibly start Tamara TCM Wellness Clinic.

What’s your professional philosophy?
Integrity and compassion are the roots of this business and a commitment to growth and stability resulting in wellness.

How do you stay motivated?
I simply love what I do. Every day I wake up with excitement for the possibilities of the day.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
This month is the 7th year anniversary of creating Tamara TCM Inc. I started with just one room and an idea. That idea took flight with a lot of attention & care and now we have grown to a clinic with multiple practitioners and an office staff. What do you do with an idea? You change the world!

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Stephanie Soldner

Barr’s Public House
3355 Briarfield Blvd., Maumee. 419-866-8466.
barrspublichouse.com

What do you do?
I am the Managing Partner.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
“What do I need to improve?”

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Try to live a balanced life.

How, if at all, has being a woman impacted your career?
Positively, by my intuition and motherly attributes; this business is my baby.

What woman do you most admire?
Oprah Winfrey, she seems to have it all figured out, and I enjoy meditating with her and Deepak.

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Not to worry about competition, just make sure that what’s within these four walls is the best it can be.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
Compassion and empathy. I like to take care of my employees because they take care of our guests.

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Continuing the #metoo movement, and breaking down social norms of superficial beauty.

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Legalizing my partnership here.

How has your industry changed for women since you first got your start?
There are more women in leadership roles, and women in the restaurant industry are demanding more respect. A woman should never feel that she needs to flirt or take unwanted advancements from men to receive a good tip in return.

What’s your professional philosophy?
There is always room for improvement and never stop learning.

How do you stay motivated?
Every day is a new challenge and I really like getting it all figured out; it’s exciting to me!

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
I have not felt that way yet, but it’s encouraging that our business has been open for seven years now. Maybe I’ll feel that way on our 10 year anniversary.

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Dorothy Bryan

Cake Arts Bakery & Supply
2858 W. Sylvania Ave., 419-472-4959.
cakeartssupply.com

What do you do?
I am the owner of Cake Arts Bakery & Supply, and we will be celebrating 25 years in business on May 17th. Not only do we offer incredible bakery items, we educate budding bakers with cake decorating, candy making, and cake baking classes.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Get enough sleep.

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Opening the bakery and finding the right people.

How do you stay motivated?
My wonderful customers who keep coming back, showing that they love what we do, and asking for special orders that they know only we can make for them.

rhonda-wise

Rhonda Wise

Beacon Associates
1755 Indianwood Cir. Suite 200, Maumee.
419-482-0280
Beaconexperts.com

An early experience I am grateful for:
As a young woman, I had a family member who owned his own business. Watching him navigate small business ownership lit my entrepreneurial fire. By the age of 19, I owned three small businesses, with dreams to expand. When I met my husband and best friend, Steven Wise, he had a similar entrepreneurial drive. His belief in me fostered my confidence and passion to succeed, and together we are living our dream of owning our own business.

My three secrets to success:
Positive energy. Passion. Integrity.

How, if at all, has being a woman impacted your career?
Being a woman has not affected my ability to succeed as a small business owner. I was raised to believe I could do anything that I set my mind to. This isn’t to say I haven’t had setbacks, because I have. However, being confident, without being arrogant, has allowed me the opportunity to take risks and grow my business.

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Lisa Kelly, PT, CSCI, C/NDT

Alternative Physical Therapy
2526 North Reynolds Rd., Toledo.
28442 E. River Rd., Perrysburg.
419-578-4357.
alternativephysicaltherapy.com

What do you do?
I am the owner and director of Alternative Physical Therapy Outpatient clinics located both Toledo and Perrysburg. Very proud to have been voted Runner-Up for Physical Therapy in Best of Toledo voting in 2018!

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
Are YOU able to see your dream large enough and clearly enough to truly DO whatever it takes to be successful, EVEN when it’s not convenient.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Every professional woman should remember that her ability to multitask will come in handy, but occasionally your “family roles” need to be allowed time and energy, such as being a spouse or partner, a mother, a daughter, a friend or just BEING YOU! It will clarify your perspective, freshen your outlook, improve your emotional health and maximize your JOY!

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
After 21 years of working in rehabilitation hospitals, I made the decision to leave the security of these positions and start my own private practice physical therapy clinic in 2002. Hence, Alternative Physical Therapy was created.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
When I realized how I’ve grown from only myself and my knowledge base to two clinics: one I purchased and totally renovated, a 4000 sq. ft. building at 2526 N. Reynolds Rd. in Toledo, and clinic in Perrysburg on East River Rd and E, Boundary in the Medical Building.  I also offer a wellness approach with Pilates and Yoga, Massage, Essential Oils, Community classes, Clinical Nutrition, an esthetician, and THE STROKE LIFE CENTER. Then, when we were named Best Of Toledo Runner-up For Physical Therapy in 2018, I took a big deep breath, thanked God and a lot of friends and staff, sighed and smiled.

Angela

Angela Parton

Solutions for Hair
4352 W. Sylvania Ave., 419-843-4247.
solutionsforhair.org

What do you do?
I provide solutions to individuals suffering from many different types of hair loss and thinning with non-invasive hair grafts, hair extensions, and hair additions.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
Have I taken all the necessary steps needed today to reach my next goal?”

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
Don’t forget to take of yourself, despite how crazy life may get.

What stereotype about feminine weakness do you think is actually a point of power?
Empathy. It’s often implied that women have a tendency to be too sensitive in many situations, however, having the ability to empathize with my clients allows me to offer them a better experience while in my salon.

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Deciding to leave my hourly job to venture out and open my own salon.

What’s your professional philosophy?
A positive attitude and environment is the cornerstone of success.

How do you stay motivated?
I genuinely enjoy what I do each day, it’s more than just a job for me. Making people feel good about themselves and giving them their hair and confidence back makes it all worth it for me every day

mobile-bonds

Sarah Stuart

Mobile Bonds LLC
445 Earlwood Ave., Suite 103,
Oregon, OH. 419-376-7713.
facebook.com/horner007

What do you do?
I am a Bail Bondsman Located in Oregon, Ohio.

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Understanding that people will always try to cut you out to get ahead. You have to stand strong and stay focused on your purpose.

What woman do you most admire?
The woman I most admire is Oprah Winfree. I’m sure she is a woman that is widely admired. For myself, I can relate to her in so many ways. She faced many adversities in her life, as have I. Then she found her purpose and passion in a career that took her places she probably never dreamed she be. She pushed through, stayed humble and became a voice for so many who didn’t believe they had one.

What’s your professional philosophy?
My professional philosophy is most importantly providing professionalism and providing my clients with prompt professional service that is affordable, while offering options for them with regard to financing so that they can get their loved ones back home.

What has been the most surreal “wow I made it” moment in your career?
I think the most surreal “wow I made it” moment was the 3rd year that I was in business for myself. I was sitting back thinking one day about everything that I had accomplished since I decided to venture out on my own. I then began thinking, “Wow, I made it!” I’ve built an incredible business with the help of friends and family and a whole lot of love from this amazing city! I couldn’t have done it without them. I’ve built many many friendships throughout the years in this business and these are also the people that have helped me make this business what it is today.

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Wood County
Kelli Kling, Director
Holly Hartlerode, Curator
Marissa Muniz, Marketing & Events Coordinator

Wood County Historical Center & Museum
13660 County Home Rd., Bowling Green.
419-352-0967. woodcountyhistory.org

What do you do?
My role as museum director is to coordinate the daily operations, which include preserving the history and maintenance of the site, welcoming visitors, and developing programs and exhibits that educate and entertain the public. The goal is to uphold the mission of the Historical Society, connecting stories of Wood County’s past to relevant experiences of today. —KK

How do you stay motivated?
In this field, we are learning every day. It is easy to stay motivated when there are new stories to uncover that reveal how similar we are to our past. —KK

What woman do you most admire?
I most admire my grandmother, Millie Sramcik (1909-1999). Millie faced adversity at a time when women worked to be heard. Her intelligence inspires me to learn something new everyday, to never give up when things are tough, and to exhibit kindness and understanding to the underserved. —HH

What’s the best advice you have ever received?
My father told me to find a job I love because then it will never feel like I “have” to go to work. —HH

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Being accepted and taken serious by the previous generation. As a Millennial, I want to be given the same chance and shown the same respect as women in the workplace before me. —MM

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Lindsey Camargo

Board & Brush Creative Studio
6725 Central Ave., 419-245-8516.
boardandbrush.com/sylvania

What do you do?
Board & Brush Creative Studio is a DIY wood studio where you can come and create unique wood decor projects from scratch in a fun instructional workshop. It’s such a great place to bring your friends, family, co-workers, significant others and kids. We have over 200 designs and add more each month. We have a liquor license which allows us to have wine and beer for sale in the studio. In June 2017, I opened our second studio in Medina, Ohio, so if you are in the Cleveland or Akron area, check out our Medina studio and say “Hi” to my partner, Jamie.

What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken in your career?
Leaving my secure job with an established local law firm to open Board & Brush Sylvania. I was extremely excited to bring Board & Brush to our area and thankfully had full support of my husband and family/friends to go for it. I really enjoy having my kids know that being an entrepreneur is an option.

What’s something readers might not know about you?
I lived in Santander, Spain in 2001 for about a year and became fluent in Spanish. My husband is Brazilian and after several trips to Brazil, I also speak Portuguese. I am hoping my four children will learn one of these languages.

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Angie Scott

Angie Scott Skin Health
3409 Sterns Rd., Lambertville, MI. 734-569-6066.
angiescottskinhealth.com

What do you do?
I provide clinical, corrective skincare services, including but not limited to chemical peels, laser treatments, micro-needling, skin cancer treatments and cosmetic tattooing.

What’s one thing every entrepreneur should ask themselves?
I believe that the biggest sacrifice that you make as a business owner is the sacrifice of time. Asking yourself if you have the time to commit— evenings and weekends— if need be, to be able to ensure success.

What women do you most admire?
I admire strong, independent women. All of them. I am inspired by them every day.

What’s one thing every professional woman should remember?
Be strong, be brave, but most of all, be kind. Help others to succeed in business if you have the opportunity.

What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for the next generation of women?
Not missing out on all of the opportunities available to us!

What’s your professional philosophy?
To always be honest with my patients. Being transparent about results and managing people’s expectations is key.

How do you stay motivated?
Education is what keeps me motivated. New studies, science and constant improvement in technology keep me excited!

  • Cami Roth Szirotnyak

    As always, I’m excited to see a focus on women in business, particularly in my home town. But this is the second year in a row that TCP’s focus has failed to include the rich *diversity* of women-owned businesses in this region. (And are some of the women who were in this year’s issue the same as last year’s…?)

    • Digital Media

      Thanks for reading and commenting. “Women In Business” is a special advertising section, that is, advertisers pay in order to be in the section. It is marked that way in our print publication (it says ‘Special advertising section’ at the top of each page) and any and all advertisers are welcome to participate. That section used to be called “Women Owned Business” but we changed it to say “Women In Business” to reflect non-owners too.
      We take great pride in representing the entire community. We encourage you to check out some of the editorial stories on our site— some of our most recent favorites, a cover story on The Cut, a #BuyBlackToledo resource guide, and profiles on Milestones for Women— to see how we try to be inclusive and aware of the diversity in our community.
      If you’d like to discuss further, let us know. We’re always open to ideas.
      Thanks again and keep reading!