Mac Sabbath

. August 13, 2019.
The Black Sabbath tribute band offers a whoppin’ good time with Okilly Dokilly, a metal band inspired by Ned Flanders of The Simpsons, on Friday, August 30 at Frankie’s. Photo Credit: Paul Koudounaris
The Black Sabbath tribute band offers a whoppin’ good time with Okilly Dokilly, a metal band inspired by Ned Flanders of The Simpsons, on Friday, August 30 at Frankie’s. Photo Credit: Paul Koudounaris

Fast food tributes, served with a side of gimmick

Mike Odd has a tough job. He’s the man in charge of Mac Sabbath, the world’s greatest drive-through metal band that’s made up of twisted doppelgangers of McDonaldland inhabitants led by a creepy clown who’s got a problem with fast food and sings about it via Black Sabbath songs.

Out of the Frying Pan

An instant sensation after Black Sabbath posted its video for “Frying Pan,” a reworking of “Iron Man” on social media on New Year’s Day 2015, Mac Sabbath burst out of Southern California and has since been wreaking its fries-meet-heavy-rock havoc around the world.

‘Ronald’ Osbourne, the twisted genius behind Mac Sabbath, who bears a striking resemblance to a certain clown from the fast-food chain which is not named to avoid copyright infringement claims, shares his last name with Black Sabbath’s star, Ozzy.

He’s joined in Mac Sabbath by cheeseburger headed guitarist Slayer Mac Cheeze, gumdrop-shaped bassist Grimalice, who may or may not be related to Grimace, and drummer Catburgler, a particularly twisted cross between the Hamburgler and The Catman from Kiss.

Their repertoire consists of Black Sabbath songs repurposed for Ronald’s campaign to free the earth of fast food. So “Paranoid” becomes “Pair-a-Buns,” “Sweet Leaf” is in Mac Sabbath’s hands, “Sweet Beef” and “Never Say Die” becomes “Never Say Diet.”

The band began playing shows around California. Then came the social media posts from Black Sabbath. “That’s what really made it happen,” Odd said. “You’ve got to give it up to Black Sabbath, not just for influencing the band, but for promoting the band, It wouldn’t have gotten to this level if they didn’t get the joke and support it.”

Creepy, psychadelic and delicious

The Black Sabbath post landed the band an invitation to play England’s Download Festival, along with Kiss, Judas Priest and Motley Crue. Returning to the U.S., Mac Sabbath has extensively toured the country, continuing to connect with fans.

“There’s something that happened with these characters and Black Sabbath,” he said. “ I guess it’s the way they work together so well. They’re both so psychedelic and ‘70s and creepy at the same time. There’s something about the nature of people who like Black Sabbath that relates to the cheeseburger culture as well— for reasons that don’t need to be enumerated.”

For now, Mac Sabbath exists only on stage, where it brings its thundering chaos. “It lasts a little over an hour,” Odd said. “It depends on Ronald. He’s not very predictable. There are a good eight to 12 songs depending on what happens.”

Ultimately it’s good, clean, loud rocking fun for the whole family— at least that’s how Odd sees it. “One of the most amazing things about it is it looks like this big scary, gnarly thing with these laser-eyed skull clowns and this heavy creepy music, this absolute heavy metal evil thing,” he said “When you break it all down after it’s over, everything he’s doing is a kid-friendly, family thing. No sex or drugs or anything of that stuff. It’s entertainment that the family could enjoy.”

See Mac Sabbath play with Okilly Dokilly (metal inspired by Ned Flanders of The Simpsons), Playboy Manbaby, and local act The Ice Cream Militia.
7pm | Friday, August 30
Frankie’s Inner-City, 308 Main St.
419-724-8000 | Innovationconcerts.com
$18, in advance | $20, day of show
$23 for under 21 without a ticket