City Politics 2020: Meet the Candidates

. October 1, 2020.
voting

US CONGRESS: OHIO 5TH DISTRICT


Bob Latta HeadshotBob Latta

(R) (Incumbent)
Age: 64
Education: University of Toledo, J.D.; Bowling Green State University, B.A.; Bowling Green High School
Prior elected experience: Wood County Commissioner 1991-1996, Ohio Senate 1997-2000, Ohio General Assembly 2001-2007, U.S. Congress, 2007-Present


In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?
Creating jobs and increasing wages for American families; Beating COVID-19 and getting our economy back to full speed; Bringing our critical supply chain back from China and supporting American manufacturing

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
Integrity – My constituents expect me to represent them in Washington, and I take this responsibility very seriously. It’s important that I vote the right way for the right reasons. I always think about what’s best for the people of Northwest and West Central Ohio, and what is in line with their values.
Industriousness – The people of Ohio’s 5th Congressional District work hard, and they expect me to work hard too. Only one House member has a better voting attendance record than me and multiple non-partisan sources have ranked me as one of the most effective Members of Congress in terms of getting things done.
Honesty – There is too much dishonesty in politics today. I always strive to be open, honest, and accountable to my constituents.

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
It’s incumbent on everyone in elected office to listen. Too often, politicians try to talk at voters instead of hearing what they have to say. Over the last eight years, I’ve had more than 1,100 meetings in the district, I hold regular Telephone Town Halls when I’m in Washington, and I conduct Courthouse Conferences where I can hear from constituents one on one. These discussions often bear fruit, and I’ve had bills signed into law that started out as conversations with people I represent.

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
The national debt. I’ve consistently voted against reckless government spending and for a balanced budget amendment. The government should be like a family sitting around the kitchen table – only spending what it brings in. However, we are headed towards a reckoning where a great amount of our revenue could be eaten up by interest payment on our debt. This crisis is just around the corner.

Name a policy issue that you think receives too much attention.
Divisiveness and partisanship in Washington. I work really well with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, and many of the initiatives I push are done in a productive way with Democrats. Too often, the focus is on the most contentious issues, while much productive work is getting done. I think there is just too much focus on the disagreements.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
The births of my daughters, Elizabeth and Maria. Being a parent is the best and toughest job there is.

Share a career mistake that you made, and how you handled it and what you learned from it.
Every day brings new challenges and situations.  You have to be ready to meet them head on.

For incumbents only: What is your proudest achievement during the time you’ve served?
I’ve worked hard to pass many pieces of legislation during my time in Congress.  Every piece has had important consequences on people across the country from over the counter drugs, broadband, opioids, veterans, propane, fighting robocalls, and precision agriculture to name a few.

What political figure do you admire most?
America has been blessed to have leaders like Washington, Lincoln and Reagan in very trying periods of our history.

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?
I believe we will have a huge general election turnout.

What was the last book you read?
I’m a history buff, so I just finished the 6th edition of a series on Winston Churchill – two more to go!

 

Nick Rubando HeadshotNick Rubando

(D)
Age: 32
Education: St. John’s Jesuit High School / Indiana University
Political experience: Student Volunteer Obama ’08 / Field Organizer Katie Hill for Congress ’18
Work experience: Currently work for Metropark Toledo
Prior elected experience: First Time Candidate


In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?

The pandemic. We need to ensure testing is readily available, we must have a plan in place to open back up safely, and it is essential that we provide healthcare as a human right. Our Economy. With over 1 million Ohioans unemployed, we must invest in local infrastructure to get our economy back on track. The environment. We need to ensure we are incentivising alternative energy and leading the way on environmental justice. 

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
Publicize local elections. Local officials have the opportunity to make a huge impact in one’s community. In many cases these elections can be decided by less than 10 votes. 

What makes your perspective a fresh addition to the National legislature?
One family has held this seat for 42 of the last 60 years. It is important that we have someone in this seat who will actually listen to the people of this district, hold a town hall, and work for the working class.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
At my previous workplace, I helped fight for higher wages for our customer service representatives by organizing my fellow employees and taking their concerns directly to our CEO. In doing so, I helped secure living wages and better benefits for everyone.

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
Mental Health in America. Especially during this pandemic, we have seen a troubling rise in adults and children in the US struggling with mental health issues. This can also lead to an increase in opioid abuse. The state of Ohio has seen opioid overdose deaths increase about 29.5% in the first six months of 2020 versus the same period in 2019.   

What was the last book you read?
Unholy Toledo
by Harry R. Illman, I especially enjoyed the chapter about one of this city’s greatest mayors, Samuel “Golden Rule” Jones. 

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?
Not enough individuals realize the power they possess as voters. 

Has Ohio done enough to combat the spread of COVID-19?
No, we should be doing more to make testing easily available in more rural areas. 

 

US CONGRESS: OHIO 9TH DISTRICT

 

Marcy Kaptur headshot-polMarcy Kaptur

(D) (Incumbent)
Age: 74
Education: University of Wisconsin, BA History, 1968; University of Michigan, MA Urban Planning, 1974; MIT, doctoral studies, 1981
Prior elected experience: Precinct Committeeperson, 1970-present; Member of Congress, 1983-present


In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?
Ensuring economic security for all Americans includes security in employment, health insurance, retirement, education, and assistance for the most vulnerable, securing U.S. jobs with living wages and guaranteed benefits. We can start by fully funding public education, lifting families, and securing Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Addressing the student debt will enable graduates to pursue their full potential. Finally, a responsible energy policy that reduces reliance on fossil fuels and develops renewable energy sources.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
Challenged by local veteran Roger Durbin at a fish fry to build a national World War II Memorial, he and I began a seventeen-year odyssey to write and pass a Bill and see this dream to completion. Now, the National World War II Memorial is the most visited site in the nation’s capital where millions visit, wonder in that achievement of the 20th Century, and interact with the remaining members of “the Greatest Generation.”

How will you be voting this year— absentee or in-person?
I encourage everyone to request their absentee ballot and vote by mail as I will.  I am disappointed in Ohio’s Controlling Board’s rejection of a measure to provide postage for ballots to make it easier and safer to vote. There must be no barrier to voting. Cost must never be a barrier for a person to exercise their Constitutionally protected right to vote. I will never stop fighting for fairer and safer elections.

Rob Weber HeadshotRob Weber

(R)
Age:  48 years old
Education:  U.S. Military Academy at West Point, B.S., Environmental Engineering; University of Louisville, M.B.A.; Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, J.D.
Prior elected experience: None


Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
Unfortunately, the issue of human trafficking does not receive anywhere near enough attention.  The I-80/90 corridor in Ohio is a major human trafficking transportation route.  Northwest Ohio and Toledo serves as one of the country’s (and even the world’s) largest trafficking hubs based on its geographic proximity to state/national borders and Toledo’s relatively low socio-economic condition. Human trafficking is a real issue in America and Ohio.  NW Ohio needs representation who will bring attention to this problem and help create solutions that will bring an end to this scourge on society.

In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?
Three of the major issues that concern voters this year are: Jobs, Public Safety, and Covid-19. The 9th District has been devastated by a mass exodus of good quality and high-paying jobs since NAFTA in 1994 and China’s introduction into the WTO in 2001. Additionally, Marcy Kaptur voted “NO” on the recent USMCA trade agreement. The average person does not agree with the lawlessness that is being allowed to occur across America. The public generally supports proper funding and training of formal law enforcement agencies, which ensures that our local communities are kept safe and secure. The public rightfully wants to balance appropriate measures for Covid-19 that are truly necessary for our collective health with getting the economy fully running and life back to normal.

What makes your perspective a fresh addition to the state legislature?
I will bring a fresh perspective to Congress by being an anti-establishment political outsider.  Both parties are dominated by career politicians who put their personal interests ahead of those of their constituents. Marcy Kaptur has held this seat for 38 years since 1983. I would suggest that Ohio’s North Coast has significantly declined under her  representation. I bring the perspective of someone who has actually worked in the real world outside of politics – first by leading America’s soldiers as an officer in the U.S. Army and then by helping regular people find solutions to their problems as a trial lawyer.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
Being elected to serve Ohio’s 9th Congressional District as its representative would be the proudest moment of my life. However, to date, attending and graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and subsequently leading combat arms soldiers as an Armor (tanks) officer is my proudest moment. At West Point and in the Army, I internalized the values of good leadership, selfless service, taking care of my soldiers, and dedicating a  “Lifetime of Service to Nation,” which has stayed with me and is the motivation for my desire to serve the public once again in a representative capacity as a Congressman.

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
I believe that the events of 2020 themselves have served to combat voter apathy, disinterest, and lack of civic engagement. The global health pandemic (along with its politicization) has gotten the attention of the general public. Moreover, the violent riots across America and the destruction of so many cities under the current trend of encouraged lawlessness has awoken the public at large. Lastly, voter apathy can be combated with a message of real change as most voters are dissatisfied with the career establishment politicians of Washington, D.C.  The American people have woken up and realized that to implement positive change, they must vote to replace professional politicians with qualified representatives from the working community.

What political figure do you admire most?
Former President Ronald Reagan is the political figure I admire most.

How will you be voting this year— absentee or in-person?
I will vote in-person during the early voting period, which begins on October 6th, at my county Board of Elections office.

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?Consistent with previous years, this year’s primary voter turnout in Ohio was relatively low, which reflects the fact that many voters in Ohio (and especially in the 9th Congressional District) are non-affiliated Independent voters who do not necessarily vote a so-called “straight party ticket.”

 

OHIO HOUSE: DISTRICT 44

 

Paula Hicks-Hudson

(D) (Incumbent)
(No responses received)

 

robert mcmahonRobert McMahon

(R)
Age: 38
Education: BA Economics MA Economics University of Toledo St Francis de Sales HS
Experience: Registered Assistant Savage and Associates / Royal Alliance 2015- current, Former Owner Budapest Restaurant 2005-2012, Visiting Professor / Adjunct Economics Lourdes University and University of Toledo, 2018-20,2014-2015  Music Director Catholic and Other Churches 2000-current
Prior elected experience: County Central Committee only, no paid office or office against another party


In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?
Justice for all citizens in all facets of daily life. Safety and Health Security in daily life.  The brokenness of communication between all citizens and between citizens and elected or unelected officials.

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
Character is doing what is correct when others are not watching. Someone is always watching.  Active listening is a practice that underlies the value of Understanding. Everyone’s perspective has value. Forgiveness is a vital part of all relationships. Holding a grudge about past offenses is toxic.  

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
Term limits to keep politicians from making a career of elected office. Create some kind of office holder accountability/transparency; make all office holders explain in their own words and understanding why they voted for or against legislation after admitting whether they actually read it or not. 

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
Historic lack of school choice is a civil rights issue that has not allowed the children of minority citizens to get as good an education as they should. 

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
I married my wife Sarah in 2015. I commited my life in front of God and man to a new creation of family not known before.       

Share a career mistake that you made, and how you handled it and what you learned from it.
When I owned and operated the restaurant I did not embrace new technology, content to be old fashioned. I have tried to learn to use all tools that are available to accomplish good outcomes. 

What makes your perspective a fresh addition to the state legislature?
I have lived and worked in the district my entire life. I have had a broad range of work experiences and community involvement including the Knights of Columbus, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Bavarian Benevolent Society.

What political figure do you admire most?
Ronald Reagan was able to capture the essence of what it meant to hold strong views and work across the aisle to accomplish the work of government while remaining optimistic about the future.  

Has Ohio done enough to combat the spread of COVID-19?
I think Governor Dewine cares deeply for the safety of the citizens of Ohio and has done his best to balance the health and safety of those who may become exposed to the COVID-19 and the health and safety of those who may lose every stable thing they have if a lockdown is long and draconian.

Is there enough diversity in state politics?
Justice and the general welfare are the goal; If the representatives do not look like me, it does not preclude them from enacting policies that are just.

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?
Additional education is needed to remind everyone of the importance of the primary in terms of having a greater impact on the eventual nominee.

What was the last book you read?
Relentless Optimism: How a Commitment to Positive Thinking Changes Everything by Darrin Donnelly

How will you be voting this year— absentee or in-person?
In person.

 

OHIO HOUSE: DISTRICT 45

 

Lisa S. Sobecki

(D) (Incumbent)
(No responses received)

 

shane loganShane Logan

(R)
Age: 23 years old
Education: University of Toledo College of Business and Innovation (August 2015 – Present), Whitmer high School Graduate (2015)
Work experience: Independent Contractor (December 2018 – Present), Kroger Deli Worker (September 2016 – April 2017) Prior elected experience: First time candidate


In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?

1. Coronavirus, 2. Economic Issues/security, 3. Educational Issues. These three issues are the topics I hear voters most concerned about when talking with them. The people of the district are frustrated with the current leadership from the incumbent and are tired of how things have been handled within the state house. 

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
1. Knowledge, 2. Service, 3. Excellence. My three personal values are three of five from my fraternity Phi Gamma Delta also known as FIJI. These values were also instilled in my education through Washington Local School District and I have held these, and I continue to strive to represent these values in all aspects of my daily life. These values influence my work by pushing me to become a better and more consistent leader within my workplace and in my community.

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
To combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement we need to reintroduce Civics back into the classroom/education system in Ohio.

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
I believe that Mental Health is an issue that doesn’t receive enough attention. Mental Health is an issue that affects every demographic of people and has increased amongst the younger generation due to many things. 

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
The proudest moment in my adult life so far has to be graduating high school. It was the toughest four years of my life juggling my academics with sports year-round. The reason why it made me so proud was due to the fact that I faced many challenges on and off the field and managed to overcome them and make me a stronger person. 

Share a career mistake that you made, and how you handled it and what you learned from it.
A career mistake that I made was not doing enough studying for my Life Insurance exam. I failed the exam the first time I took it and it really affected my mental and physical health.  I handled the situation by buckling down and taking the situation much more seriously and passed it the next time around. What I learned from it was the lesson never take anything for granted, and make sure you truly understand the subject matter so that you are prepared for the future.

What makes your perspective a fresh addition to the state legislature?
My perspective to the state legislature if elected will create a fresh addition by not trying to make a career out of politics and try to find common ground with members of the other party. 

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?
The low turnout in a presidential election has multiple implications and to me it means many things. To start with, I believe this year is an exception due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, Toledo/Lucas county has continued to have a lackluster turnout in many of the past election cycles. I believe many people are not happy with the same people running for office and are disheartened and choose to stay home. 

What was the last book you read?
The last book I read was the bible. I have been reading this in search of answers and a better understanding of history. 

How will you be voting this year— absentee or in-person?
This year I will be voting in person. I believe it is a great tradition to do so and it guarantees that your vote will be counted .

 

OHIO HOUSE: DISTRICT 46

 

Michael Sheehy, House of Representatives District 46Michael Sheehy

(D) (Incumbent)
Age: 72
Education: B.A. in Political Science, University of Toledo; U.S, Army Officer Adjutant General School Graduate,; Conductor Training Program CSX  Graduate, Cardinal Stritch High School
Work experience: CSX: 40 years as Conductor and/or Instructor Conductor Training Program;  US Army: Office Manager as Lieutenant
Prior elected experience: Ohio House of Representatives: 2013 – present; Oregon City Council: 1993 – 2013

 

In your mind, what are the three top issues on voters’ minds this election season:
Coronavirus issues of avoidance, treatment, possible vaccine, and its effects on homes, healthcare and the workplace. Social justice issues extended to all Ohio citizens. Respect for and compliance with laws; respect for local law enforcement and safety personnel

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work:
Honesty, hard work and loyalty are three personal values which have helped build my character and influenced the decisions I make.

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention:
The health of the Great Lakes, especially that of Lake Erie does not receive enough attention. Excessive nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) affect the health of the lake, endangering clean (drinking) water and the state’s recreational industries.

Name a policy issue that you think receives too much attention:
Too much attention is focused on attacking / limiting the rights of women (which are constitutionally protected). Some state laws have been passed that are patently unconstitutional.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
The proudest moment was when my wife and I realized that our four adult children have become honest, productive citizens and parents. I feel this is a stellar achievement.

What is your proudest achievement during the time you have served?
The passage and signing into law a Bill I sponsored in my first term as a State Representative. This law requires the driver of a vehicle, while passing a bicyclist, maintain three feet between the vehicle and the bicyclist. This clearly saves lives.

What political figure do you admire most?
Medal of Freedom recipient, (former Vice President) Joseph Biden, who endured the tragic loss of his first wife and children yet continues to heroically serve our great nation. 

Has Ohio done enough to combat the spread of COVID-19?
In the early stages of the pandemic, Ohio acted appropriately, but much still needs to be done to bring Ohio back to being a safe, healthy and vibrant state.

Is there enough diversity in state politics?
Great strides have been made with respect to diversity in the State House and Senate, but diversity lags in state-wide politics.

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters.  What does that mean to you?The most recent primary was hampered by the COVID crisis, but low primary turnout numbers are an indication that many voters view the Primary Election as less important that the General Election.

What was the last book you read?
Destiny of the Republic: a Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard was the last book I read.

How will you be voting this year—absentee or in-person?
I will be voting in-person at the Early Voting Center (wearing a mask).

 

steve salanderSteven A. Salander

(R)
Age: 48
Education: BS in Business from UT
Work experience: Worked in Banking for 3 years and owned my own tech business (Salander Office Support) for 10 years
Prior elected experience: Party precinct leader March of 2020


Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
Integrity – actions match your words. Character – doing what’s right no matter if it’s seen.  Transparency – keeping public involved and informed. All 3 [were] exhibited in my fight against 911 dispatch consolidation over the last year and for Oregon PT Fire most recently

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
Keep them involved and informed all along the way. And I can show them things I’ve been able to get accomplished as a citizen. Together we can do great things.

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
Human trafficking and child abuse prior to this most recent election season. And I hope it continues after the election and isn’t just a campaign topic. I’ve been actively working on it with Voices 4 Victims for several years.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
Adoption of my daughter. No other job title that’s more important to me than Dad.

For newcomers only: What makes your perspective a fresh addition to the state legislature?
Not being a lifetime politician, I’m not owned or involved in the special interests of corporations. Also I live on a budget, cut coupons, have dug myself out of debt. I get it from the every day perspective.

What political figure do you admire most?
Ronald Reagan. He did a great job unifying the people and parties.  We need more unity and less pointing fingers and division. We need all perspectives to work together.

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?
It’s too bad we celebrate less than a quarter of registered voters. We need to encourage and work together to make sure it’s as easy as possible for all to participate. Let our voice be heard. And the best way for us to make a change is to vote.

What was the last book you read?
Outwitting the Devil by Napoleon Hill.

 

OHIO HOUSE: DISTRICT 47

 

Derek Merrin

(R) (Incumbent)
(No responses received)


larsonNancy Larson (LISW-S)

(D)
Age: 66
Education: BA in Psychology; Speech/ Communications; Graduate degree – MSW, Masters of Social Work (University of Pgh.)
Work experience: I have been doing social work for 4 decades in various capacities. I worked for Harbor Behavioral Healthcare for 12 years and did my work for them at the Lucas County Probation Department – rehabilitative counseling with convicted sex offenders. I worked for Fresenius Medical Care for 8 years, providing medical social work to dialysis patients. Have worked in hospice and in my own private practice in Sylvania. I’ve lived in the Toledo area for 30 years.
Prior elected experience: First time candidate


In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?
1) The coronavirus and the possibility they or loved ones will fall ill and possibly die. 2) Many people have lost their jobs and are unable to pay bills or afford food, so finding work and getting safely back to work is paramount. 3)  How their children will be educated – will they fall behind with virtual learning or be safe in school buildings. Moms are leaving the workforce to home school or because childcare is not available. 

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
1) Authenticity— I value being open, and speaking my mind frankly. That has been helpful to me in building quick rapport with people over the years. 2) Honesty— I value being trusted and the way to make that happen is to be truthful. 3) Service to others— I value being a giver. I’ve spent my life teaching skills to clients to manage life’s problems, as well as helped patients work through emotional blocks to improve mental health.

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
As a member of the League of Women Voters, this is a very important issue to me. Overturning Citizens United, and publicly funding elections would remove the $ that perverts our democratic process. The election cycle needs to be shortened to a few months (3?) with public debates, equal TV access/print opportunities for all candidates. AVR (automatic voter registration), mail in ballots (as some states already have). This encourages more engagement, I think. 

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
Since the Statehouse majority recently refused to even acknowledge the existence of systemic racism as a public health issue when they had the chance to do so, I would say that one is receiving NO attention from the ruling party. Institutionalized racism continues to underlie many of our most problematic areas –  including poverty, educational failure, inadequate healthcare outcomes, prison populations, and most recently – more illnesses and deaths from the pandemic for people of color. 

What makes your perspective a fresh addition to the state legislature?
Social workers have a variety of skills that seem to me to be sorely needed. We are not money driven, or we wouldn’t be social workers in the first place. Our ethical codes of conduct preclude us taking bribes and acting on our own interests ahead of our client’s wellbeing. We know how to listen, to navigate thorny issues (such as we see in family/couple counseling), and we look to solve problems that honor all stakeholders. 

Has Ohio done enough to combat the spread of COVID-19?
Governor DeWine and Dr. Amy Acton did enough to combat the spread of COVID- 19 and keep us safe, but they were derailed by the Republican anti-science forces in the Statehouse. 

Is there enough diversity in state politics?
No, there is not enough diversity in state politics, because we have just 29% women in power across the state instead of the 51% it should be. 

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?
It means that our democracy is very frail indeed, and we will not have it post Nov. if that % isn’t tripled. 

What was the last book you read?
I read The Daughters of Erietown by Connie Shultz as soon as it came out. 

How will you be voting this year – absentee or in-person?
I requested my absentee ballot, which I will fill out and mail back as soon as I get it. 

 

LUCAS COUNTY TREASURER

 

lindsay webb headshotLindsay M. Webb

(D) (Incumbent)
Age: 45
Education: Juris Doctor, University of Toledo College of Law; Bachelor of Arts in Urban Studies, University of Toledo
Prior elected experience: District 6 Toledo City Council, 2007, 2011, 2015; Lucas County Treasurer 2018

In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?|
In my mind the top three issues with which voters are concerned include Covid-19, the state of the economy (and jobs) and racial/economic inequality. 

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
I value fairness, so I worked to update the rules of procedure at the Board of Revision to ensure that all parties are treated fairly.  I value the contributions of my workforce, so I devised Covid-19 policies and invested in equipment to keep them safe. I value community, so I have directly engage with neighborhood groups via The Lucas County Land Bank. 

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
For some people, it can be hard to make the connection between what happens at City Hall/The Statehouse/Washington D.C. and their daily lives. When people can see how the decisions made in these “halls of power” impact their lives, it usually changes their mind and encourages them to vote.     

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
Since I have younger children, we have had to adapt to the Covid-19 virtual learning environment, which is difficult enough. For many families, it has been made even more challenging by the lack of investment in internet infrastructure (e.g. outages and hacking) and the digital divide, or lack of access to reliable internet for some rural and poor families.     

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life and why it made you so proud.
I am really proud of my family. Becoming a wife, a mother and step-mother is a source of pride for me. Helping all of my kids grow and change, contribute to society and care about those around them, has been the greatest blessing of my life.  

What political figure do you admire most?
I really like and respect Nan Whaley, the Mayor of Dayton because she is very authentic and dedicated to her community. 

What was the last book you read?
Just Mercy, A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson

How will you be voting this year— absentee or in-person?
I will be voting absentee this year.


John Rozic Resize.2.006John W. Rozic

(R)
Age: 69
Education: Bachelor of Science, Accounting, Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland) (1973); Juris Doctor, University of Toledo College of Law (1977)
Work experience: Attorney and Partner, Shindler Neff LLP, since 1985; currently managing partner; Practice areas: business, tax, probate and trust administration, real estate, estate planning; Previously: Trust Office and Director of the Probate Trust Department, Toledo Trust Company; Public Service: In addition to elected offices below, I am Treasurer and a Board member of the Anthony Wayne Youth Soccer League, and past Trustee of the Anthony Wayne Youth Foundation
Prior elected experience: Waterville City Council, Member (2014-current)  2nd term, current member and Vice Mayor; Anthony Wayne Schools Board of Education, (2000-2008, two terms)


In your mind, what are the top three issues on voters’ minds this election season?
The economy; COVID-19; Healthcare; Civil unrest; Crime.

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
Loyalty; Honesty; Practicality; Attention to detail; Conservatism. I believe these attributes allow me to learn fast, focus on details, improve processes where possible, and help make practical choices that serve the voters, the community, and the long-term interests of all involved. These same values apply in my daily life and have served me quite well.

What can we do to combat voter apathy and encourage more civic engagement?
Our part of the State of Ohio is fundamentally the same – economically, socio-economically, and politically – as it was when I moved here in the 1970’s to attend law school.  If voters are skeptical of their County and even City leadership right now, it is understandable.  We are far beyond the time to have some balance in county government, with different viewpoints and a questioning voice.   I believe that citizens want and deserve to be able to trust that their elected officials will be accountable for their decisions and properly manage our budgets and investments across the county and region. Electing public-service-minded leaders who possess the necessary qualifications and have a commitment to transparency will help citizens to feel more engaged. 

Name a policy issue that you think doesn’t receive enough attention.
As it relates to the Treasurer’s office, I believe that many citizens do not realize how the operation of the office affects them beyond the impact on their own property or real estate taxes.  In Lucas County, over $600 million of taxpayer money passes through the Treasurer’s office annually. Those monies – the County’s income –  are taxpayer dollars, and the Treasurer is  responsible for collecting the funds, depositing the funds to the county’s accounts, and managing and investing the funds on hand for the benefit of all citizens.   I have experience in revenue collection, budgets, oversight, and management and investment of taxpayer dollars. I want to help improve, where possible, the taxpayer service while making sure that everyone and every entity pays the taxes owed.

What makes your perspective a fresh addition to county offices?
Historically, most elected offices in Lucas County have been held by Democrats. Nevertheless, I was still surprised to see that our non-judicial county government offices – Commissioner, Auditor, Recorder, Treasurer, and the rest, 11 in all – are all held by Democrats, with not one Republican serving today. I will bring balance to Lucas County leadership, in addition to my very relevant experience, and as much transparency for our taxpayers as possible. 

What political figure do you admire most?
Members of Waterville City Council, for their ability to discuss important issues facing the city, to ignore any prior disagreement when considering new issues, and to ultimately work together for the good of Waterville; any elected officeholder who is focused on serving his or her community in the best manner possible and who does not seek or hold office for personal gain.

The Ohio presidential primary election turnout this year was 22.65 percent of eligible voters. What does that mean to you?Voter turnout is usually less than what I would hope for in our representative democracy; all voters should feel a sense of responsibility to exercise their right to vote.

How will you be voting this year— absentee or in-person?
I plan to vote in-person, but I respectfully support each voter’s choice in voting, and would remind voters who plan to vote absentee to request their ballot as soon as possible. Absentee ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 2 this year to be counted. Learn more here:  https://www.ohiosos.gov/elections/voters/absentee-voting/

 

LUCAS COUNTY SHERIFF

 

earl mack 2Earl D. Mack, Jr.

(I)
Age: 70
Education: University of Toledo, Associate Degree (Applied Law Enforcement Technology) 1981 University of Louisville Southern Police Institute, Criminal Justice Administration 1998, (Senior Administrative Officers Course); Lourdes College, Bachelor’s Program (Criminal Justice) 2005
Work experience: Owner/Protection and Security Director: Key Resource Protection and Investigations, LLC, Ohio Department of Public Safety, August 2013 to present; Deputy Director of the Ohio Department of Public Safety, Division of Homeland Security, 2007-2012; Agent-in-Charge, Toledo Enforcement District Operations 1997–2005 and many more positions in law enforcement and public safety over 39 years.
Prior elected experience: First time candidate


What motivated you to work in law enforcement?
I was influenced by my uncle William Johnson, who was warden of the Dayton Correctional Center (he recommended that I use my GI bill to attend UT Law Enforcement Criminal Justice program) and my desire to become a police officer at an early age. The competitive salary and benefits one could receive with increases in rank. To change the way I witnessed my father being treated by police officers when I was 7 years old.

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
1. Empathy: this rests on four principals; awareness, caring, understanding and genuine community engagement of solutions.
2. Integrity: to me this value is important to obtain respect and trust from those depending of your leadership. Many times what may be legal may not be moral.
3. Service: Any elected official is a public servant. Citizens are our bosses and our job is to provide the very best service possible to a community.

What does the suggestion to “defund the police” mean to you?
This is emotional. With some negative citizen-police contact and no genuine discussions or transparency, affected citizens’ answer to this communication failure is to reduce the funding of police services with the belief it will reduce police authority. I emphatically do not support defunding a community police organization. I do support reallocating funds from some police services that can be performed by the private sector to better training and accountability for police actions.

What can a sheriff do to change how the citizens of Lucas County perceive law enforcement?
1. Be a strong leader in a positive and genuine community engagement initiative. This initiative will allow countywide input by citizens working together as partners to change any negative perceptions.
2. Reinforce the philosophy among the Sheriff’s Office and countywide law enforcement agencies that we are public servants providing a community “peace” service with actions of fairness. I will enforce and encourage oversight and accountability of command and supervision for their subordinates’ actions with uprightness.

Why are you the best person for the job?
Especially in today’s recent community police environment, I have the ability, experience and knowledge to bring people together, with the understanding that we all have more in common to resolve our issues. I am an independent candidate to represent people and not a party. I have demonstrated my caring and empathy commitment and dedication to citizens, our communities and families. I will be a good leader internally and externally to both the private and public sectors.

Do concealed carry laws make things safer for citizens?
Yes with adequate training, because police cannot fully protect you and your family as in the past.

Are body cameras positive or negative for law enforcement?
Street recording technology reflecting the actions of our citizens and police is necessary and positive.

What was the last book you read?
Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, highlighting an interesting correlation between economics and crime.

 

navarreMike Navarre

(D)
Age: 64
Education: Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from the University of Toledo
Experience: 43 years in Law Enforcement, 22 years as a Chief of Police
Prior elected experience:  First time candidate


What motivated you to work in law enforcement?
My father worked for the Toledo Police Department for 33 years.  Most of his career was spent in the Detective Bureau working homicides. I thought his job was incredibly interesting.  After graduating from high school, I took night classes in Criminal Justice at the University of Toledo and became even more attracted to a career in law enforcement.

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
I am honest, compassionate, and dependable. People can always count on me to tell them the truth.  I care about people and treat everyone with fairness and respect. If I say I am going to do something, it will get done. I don’t make excuses and will accept responsibility when events don’t go as planned.

What does the suggestion to “defund the police” mean to you?
I have heard a variety of explanations. Most people who use the term believe that funding to police departments can be better spent on fighting drug addiction, mental illness, and better education for our children. These are all important, but so is policing in our communities. We need to improve our police departments with more training, equipment, and better hiring practices.

What can a sheriff do to change how the citizens of Lucas County perceive law enforcement?
The Sheriff is the Chief Law Enforcement Officer of the County. The Sheriff must be an advocate for better policing by promoting accountability and transparency in all aspects of the law enforcement profession. The Sheriff should set an example for all agencies in the County by proposing meaningful police reforms and encouraging sound hiring practices, equipment acquisition, and mandating annual in-service training for all officers.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life.
Raising four children into responsible adults.

Share a career mistake that you made, how you handled it and what you learned from it.
Many years ago during labor negotiations, I agreed to a union proposal without fully realizing the financial implications. I accepted responsibility for my lack of preparation and have never made the same mistake again.

Why are you the best person for the job?
I have spent my entire adult life in law enforcement in Lucas County, including 13 years as the Chief of Police in Toledo and 9 years as the Chief in Oregon. Thus, I have both a big city and suburban perspective. I am the only candidate with this top level experience, and that is exactly what Lucas County needs right now. I enjoy challenges, and none will be greater than building a new County Jail, considering meaningful police reforms, and continuing the fight against opioid addiction.

Do concealed carry laws make things safer for citizens?
People who carry concealed handguns probably feel safer. The question is “are they safer?”  I am not sure anyone can offer a definite answer to that question as there are numerous factors that affect crime rates and community safety. It is essential that those who choose to carry act responsibly and are well-versed in gun safety. This issue is too complex for one sentence.

Are body cameras positive or negative for law enforcement?
The use of body-worn cameras (BWC’s) are here to stay and are definitely a positive. Their use provides protection to both the officers and the citizens encountered. Today’s society demands transparency and accountability from its police officers and body worn cameras help achieve that objective. This issue is too complex for one sentence.

What was the last book you read?
Natchez Burning by Greg Iles.

 

brett warnerBrett Warner

(R)
Age: 53
Education: Attended Community College of the Air Force
Experience:  28 years of Law Enforcement experience, 23 years of Military experience, 10 years elected Official as Township Trustee
Prior elected experience: Waterville Township Trustee


What motivated you to work in law enforcement?
In high school I was at an event that was becoming unlawful and dangerous. Officers arrived on scene and immediately began to separate those who were in conflict and calming people down. Within just a few minutes of their arrival I and everyone there felt safer. They prevented a bad situation from getting worse. They helped! I decided then that I wanted to be that voice of reason, the calm to the storm, someone who could help people feel safe and most importantly solve problems for the community.

Name three of your personal values and how they influence your work.
Balance: I always strive to find a fair and balanced solution to situations.
Citizenship: I am grateful for the rights and freedoms we have in our country and have always tried to repay my good fortune by serving, military, law enforcement, local government etc. I am proud to be American and serve others – and I have always lived by the motto of Service before Self.
Compassion: Listening and understanding others and their background, experience, and situation is an important part of developing compassion for people and where they are coming from.  Compassion is one of the most critical traits for any Law Enforcement Officer.

What does the suggestion to “defund the police” mean to you?
Most organizations claim that it is intended to reduce funding to Law Enforcement and redistribute it to other social services that they feel are underfunded and could replace some of the duties of Law Enforcement. I am not in favor of such action, in fact, I often suggest that most Law Enforcement is already underfunded and because of that critical update and career altering training is not provided to Law Enforcement professionals which directly reflects on those they serve.

What can a sheriff do to change how the citizens of Lucas County perceive law enforcement?
Community engagement is the answer but that requires a plan of action. Community engagement (just like training) requires funding.  Identifying officers who excel at and are motivated to directly engage with the community, getting those officers properly trained, and providing them with active opportunities to participate in the daily lives of citizens is the key.  For us to achieve these goals, however, we must be creative and inventive to find a way to pay for this higher level of involvement along with the training that it demands.

Describe the proudest moment in your adult life.
When my wife said “I do”, and every time my children say “Dad.”

Share a career mistake that you made, how you handled it and what you learned from it.
Not recognizing employee signs of drug abuse. I have learned that anyone, ANYONE can suffer from addiction. I have sworn to myself that I will always follow up on signs I see of or hear of, especially if it is a Law Enforcement Officer who is just as susceptible to drug abuse if not more.

Why are you the best person for the job?
1. I am the only candidate currently working as a Full-Time Deputy with 18 years of experience for the Office that I seek. I will take an active and visible role in being the Sheriff of the voters of Lucas County. Sometimes it is best to promote from within. I hope the voters agree!
2. At 53 years old I have developed unique and essential leadership traits to fulfill the role of Sheriff through my 23 years of Military Service and 28 years of Law Enforcement experience.
3. Community engagement is one of the most important issues facing Law Enforcement today and during the majority of my time in the Sheriff’s office I have been directly involved in these programs including educating the youth about drugs and the dangers they face every day, internet safety and security, crime prevention, and the epidemic of drug and opioid addiction.  I have had 18 years to observe, participate, and drive these programs. In that time, I have been able to formulate my plan for improving these programs and the Sheriff’s relationship with the community. If I am elected Sheriff, I will have the ability to implement my vision for improvement and bring my extensive experience to bear for the betterment of the public.

Do concealed carry laws make things safer for citizens?
I absolutely believe concealed carry laws provide a way for citizens to safely exercise their 2nd amendment rights, and to enable them to protect their life, and the lives of those they love with proper training and education. 

Are body cameras positive or negative for law enforcement?
Body cameras absolutely provide accountability, record of events and can serve as a training or learning experience and are positive for law enforcement as long as we all remember that they do not always tell the entire story and instead only provide one perspective.

What was the last book you read?
The Greatest Generation by Tom Brokaw.